All posts by Adam McPartlan

Recent college graduate. Budding film critic and sportswriter. History tutor and chess teacher in my spare time.

Christopher Nolan’s Cleverness Never Ends | Film Review: “Dunkirk”

This year, the film I have most looked forward to seeing is Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk. As a World War II buff and history teacher, when I heard this film was being made, my immediate reaction was, “Finally, a movie about the single most important event of the war.”  Without the evacuation at Dunkirk, the Normandy Invasions might not have been possible, as a large number of that D-Day force was made up of those rescued from Dunkirk’s beaches. Because of the event’s historical importance, not to mention cultural significance, the subject matter deserves an expert director, an ensemble cast, and a screenplay that presents the material in a new, exciting way.  With Nolan at the helm, and with a plethora of British stars, both old and new, Dunkirk is easily the best film of the year so far.  Continue reading Christopher Nolan’s Cleverness Never Ends | Film Review: “Dunkirk”

Return of The Sparrow: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales’ – Review

When Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides was released, I doubt anyone was more excited than I was at seeing the fourth installment of my favorite film franchise.  By the time it ended, while I enjoyed the music, Geoffrey Rush’s performance, and Johnny Depp’s usual flapping, drunken demeanor, I wished the third had been the end.  It was the perfect ending to the trilogy, you know?  Sparrow singing “A Pirate’s Life for Me” to close the series just as a young Elizabeth sang it to open it seemed like a perfect, fitting finale.  Alas, they ruined it with a fourth, nonsensical film (I’m still trying to figure out why Sam Claflin was even there to begin with), and so the need for a fifth and maybe even sixth was apparent.  Not just for monetary purposes, but to fix what Producer Jerry Bruckheimer had clearly screwed up…and thankfully, Dead Men Tell No Tales cleaned up the disasterous fourth film WALL-E style.

[Spoilers ahead] Continue reading Return of The Sparrow: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales’ – Review

More Than Just the Number

“Now batting…for the Yankees…Number 2…Derek Jeter…Number 2.”

For 20 years, Bob Sheppard’s voice graced Yankee Stadium, old and new, with these eleven words.  Even though he had died four years before Derek Jeter hit a walk-off single in his final at bat in his final home game, Jeter was announced by the centenarian every time he took his first home at bat of the game.  This is who Derek Jeter was, and is, as a man: someone who respected the integrity of the game and the names that came before him.  He wanted the “Voice of God” to announce him because it would not have been the same, or right, to be announced by anyone else.  It was a small token of appreciation for what Sheppard had done for more than 50 years of his life, and this is my small token of appreciation for what Derek Jeter has done not just for me personally, but for The Bronx, New York, for 20 years of his life.  Continue reading More Than Just the Number

TV Review: “Iron Fist”

Warning: Spoilers below.

Since the dawn of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there have been a great number of films in the action genre released with actual substance and character development.  This year’s Logan marked the pinnacle of that perfect blend of action and acting.  Of course, there have also been a few miscues on the part of MCU, mainly X-Men 3: The Last Stand and, on television, Luke Cage, which are still enjoyable, but markedly less well-made.  Marvel’s most recent release, Iron Fist, manages to hit that rare middle target of a Marvel production: great character development with more than OK acting (especially from Jessica Henwick) and writing, but a near-complete failure to deliver the action, in both choreography and editing, to which the MCU fan-base has become so accustomed.

Continue reading TV Review: “Iron Fist”

Film Review: “Logan”

This is what it feels like to say farewell to Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine: It sucks.  It is beyond painful to say goodbye to the actor/role pairing I grew up watching.  Since 2000’s X-Men, when we first met Logan, Jackman, who had only been in two films up to that point, has been a key figure in Marvel films.  Now, 17 years later, Logan shows us just how far both Wolverine has come from his glory days and Jackman has come from his youth.  And let me tell you, the destination has been well worth the ride.  Continue reading Film Review: “Logan”